Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Tallowtree Spread Increased by Hurricanes


Tallowtree Spread Increased by Hurricanes


"U.S. Forest Service data show tallow now spreading across 10 states. Its growth nearly tripled in Texas in the last two decades, and increased 500 percent in Louisiana, where its higher tolerance for salinity enables it to crowd out moss-covered bald cypress in swamps and bayous. Populations also are up along the Atlantic coast, from Florida to the Carolinas.

“Tallows take advantage of disturbances,” said Nancy Loewenstein, an invasive plant specialist at Auburn University. “Storms, floods, construction sites, logging sites, anything that disrupts the environment will give an invasive like tallow an opportunity to take over.”

James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
The help can’t come too soon for the keepers of America’s suffering forests. Tallows grow into fully mature trees in just three years, far outpacing native maples, oaks, cypress and elms. Their leaves are toxic to some animals, and they cast off litter that changes soil chemistry and disadvantages competitors.

“Chinese tallows are very competitive, and they have no natural predators here like in their native China,” said Karan Rawlins, an invasive species specialist at the University of Georgia’s Center for Invasive Species & Ecosystem Health. 'Very few if any insects recognize it as a food source, so it has basically become a super invader.'"

Read the full article by Stacey Plaisance in NWF Dailey News.



Monday, November 13, 2017

Cooperative Extension Advisor needed in California, serving Monterey, San Benito, and San Cruz Counties

The University of California Cooperative Extension Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources is looking for someone to fill the vacancy of the Cooperative Extension Advisor - Area Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Advisor - Entomology. (Cooperative Extension (CE) IPM Advisor) The position serves Monterey, San Benito, and Santa Cruz counties.


"The Area Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Advisor for Entomology will conduct a multi-county extension, education and applied research program that addresses grower and industry needs, including an understanding of local agricultural crops, their farming systems, and their arthropod pests, including insect-vectored diseases in Monterey, San Benito and Santa Cruz Counties. Primary crops include cool-season vegetables such as lettuce, and spring mix, broccoli, spinach, celery, and cauliflower, as well as strawberries, caneberries, grapes, ornamental plant production and many specialty crops. The Cooperative Extension (CE) IPM Advisor holds a pivotal role in initiating, contributing to and developing management strategies for invasive invertebrate species and new or exotic insect pests. They must also be knowledgeable about insect pest-related quarantines and interstate/international marketing requirements. Key clientele includes growers, government agencies, pest control advisors, and allied industry personnel. The Area IPM Advisor will be a member of the UC Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program (ipm.ucanr.edu) and will participate in UC IPM activities, including development and review of UC IPM online and print publications, organizational meetings, and other programmatic activities relevant to the mission and strategic plan of the Program." - taken from the position purpose section on the position vacancy announcement.

If you are interested and think you might be just what they need, contact University of California, ANR Academic HR, LeChé McGillm, (530) 750-1281, anracademicsearch@ucanr.edu, http://www.ucanr.edu/jobs
PLEASE REFER TO POSITION NUMBER AP #17-24 IN ALL CORRESPONDENCE

Monday, October 30, 2017

New Wood Boring Beetle Attacks Tree-of-heaven

First North American Records of the Eastasian Metallic Wood-
Boring Beetle Agrilus smaragdifrons Ganglbauer (Coleoptera:
Buprestidae: Agrilinae), a Specialist on Tree of Heaven
(Ailanthus altissima, Simaroubaceae)

Abstract.—The East Asian buprestid Agrilus smaragdifrons Ganglbauer is reported for the first time in the Western Hemisphere. Specimens of this species taken from emerald ash borer (A. planipennis Fairmaire) monitoring traps in New Jersey in 2015–2016 suggest establishment of this metallic wood-boring beetle in the northeastern United States. The earliest known record of A. smaragdifrons in the U.S. is based on a verifiable image found on BugGuide, from a specimen collected in Hudson County, New Jersey in June 2011. Diagnostic information and high-resolution images of the of this adventive buprestid from other North American Agrilus. A summary of information about the host plant (Ailanthus altissima), native distribution, and biology are given, and all known North American records are listed and mapped.

Authors: E. RICHARD HOEBEKE, EDUARD JENDEK, JAMES E. ZABLOTNY, RYAN RIEDER, ROSA YOO, VASILY V. GREBENNIKOV, AND LILY REN

Taken from www.BioOne.org 
Published by: Entomological Society of Washington

Monday, October 16, 2017

Minnesota Department of Agriculture is looking for an Entomologist!

Image result for MN dept of ag

Vacancy for Entomologist in Plant Protection at the Minnesota Department of Agriculture

The Minnesota Department of Agriculture is looking for an entomologist in Plant Protection. If interested in a full-time, permanent position in St. Paul all the info is below! 

"This a full-time, permanent position with the State of Minnesota located in St Paul, Minnesota. This position exists in the Pest Detection and Management Unit which is part of the Plant Protection Division at Minnesota Department of Agriculture.

This position is classified as a Research Scientist 2 and duties for this position will include:
·         Direct policy and lead multi-agency planning efforts related to prevention, early detection and rapid response to invasive pests
·         Direct project staff and budgets, and work collaboratively with scientists and other professionals within the Department of Agriculture
·         Design surveys and other activities related to target pests, as well as analyze and report resulting data
·         Lead inspections and issue state directives in the case of detections of target pests, as well as investigate violations of quarantine or other MDA directives

Candidates must meet these minimum qualifications to apply:
·         A Bachelor's in Biology, Entomology, Botany, Plant Pathology, or equivalent AND three years of professional level experience conducting survey, applied science or research of insects, plant pathogens or plant biology. (A Master's Degree in Biology, Entomology, Botany, Plant Pathology, or equivalent may substitute for one year of experience.)
·         Knowledge of scientific survey and sampling techniques, including knowledge of invasion biology
·         Leadership skills sufficient to guide activities related to survey, outreach and regulations for invasive plant insects and diseases, and explain those activities to partners and clientele.
·         The ability to operate computer software including word processing, spreadsheets and web browsers.
·         Working knowledge of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), databases, statistical analysis packages.
·         The ability to plan, organize, execute and evaluate research designs and activities independently.
·         Excellent verbal and written communication skills sufficient to write reports, summarize results, interpret technical information, and prepare information for distribution and publication.
·         Possess and maintain an active/valid driver's license with an acceptable motor vehicle record subject to review.
Preferred qualifications for candidates include:
·         Master's Degree or PhD in Biology, Entomology, Botany, Plant Pathology, or equivalent.
·         Experience conducting research of insects, plant pathogens and plant biology.
·         Experience writing and managing grants.

This is a 40 hour/week position and the salary range is $52,659 - $77,590 annually

Applications will be accepted through November 1, 2017, to apply visit the job posting at the Minnesota Careers Builder Website: https://careers.mn.gov/psp/hcm92apc/MNCAREERS/HRCR/c/HRS_HRAM.HRS_APP_SCHJOB.GBL?Page=HRS_APP_SCHJOB&Action=U&FOCUS=Applicant&SiteId=1001 search JOB ID 16975

For more information contact Angie.Ambourn@state.mn.us

Affirmative Action/ Equal Opportunity Employer
This information can be made available in alternative formats to individuals with disabilities by calling (651) 259.3637 or (651) 282-2699 (TTY)."

Thursday, October 5, 2017

Antkey Mobile, USDA ITP's newest app

Check out this app from USDA APHIS ITP! Identifty species in the field from your smartphone or tablet. 

Cover art

"The USDA APHIS ITP team is pleased to announce the latest addition to our mobile app collection: Antkey Mobile. Developed in cooperation with the tool’s author, Eli Sarnat, and Australia’s Identic team, this app is based on ITP’s web-based tool, Antkey.

Lucid Mobile apps offer you the identification keys you’ve come to rely on from the convenience of your smartphone or tablet. Antkey Mobile (free for Android or iOS) allows you to take your Lucid key with you into the field for surveys and screening, even if your field site lacks internet access. 

This key allows both specialists and novices to easily identify invasive, introduced, and commonly intercepted ant species from across the globe. You can help confirm whether you have found the correct species by comparing your specimen with the images and descriptions on the fact sheets, which are included for each species."

Wednesday, October 4, 2017

Want to move to Wisconsin?

The University of Wisconsin-Madison is looking to hire an assistant professor in the Forest and Wildlife Ecology department of the College of Agricultural & Life Sciences. You, yes you, are needed in the land of dairy to research and teach in forest ecology! Candidates need to have a PhD in forest ecology or in a closely related discipline. To apply check out the job posting here. The anticipated starting date is August 10, 2018.

Friday, September 15, 2017

Webinar on Invasive Species and Legal Challenges, Sponsored by: Agricultural and Food Law Consortium

Tackling the Challenge of Invasive Species to Reduce Impacts to Agriculture


Topic: Invasive species negatively impact agricultural operations across the country. Invasive plants reduce crop and livestock production. Invasive animals damage farmland and spread diseases. The webinar will discuss some of the major pathways for invasive species introduction and spread, the roles of federal agencies and state departments of agriculture in invasive species management, and legal challenges in the prevention and control of invasive species. The webinar will also provide an overview of the recent D.C. Circuit Court decision in U.S. Association of Reptile Keepers v. Zinke. The D.C. Circuit held that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service does not have authority under the federal Lacey Act to restrict the movement of injurious species across state lines, dealing a significant blow the Service’s invasive species program.

Time and Date: Wednesday, September 20th, 2017 from 12:00 – 1:00 (EDT)

Participation:
This webinar is offered free of charge and is limited to the first 100 registrants. It is recommended that you test your computer for software compatibility prior to the webinar by clicking here.

There is no pre-registration for this webinar. To enter the webinar, simply click here shortly before it begins.

Presenters: Stephanie Showalter Otts, Director, National Sea Grant Law Center
Stephanie is the Director of the National Sea Grant Law Center and the Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Legal Program at the University of Mississippi School of Law. Stephanie received a B.A. in History from Penn State University and a joint J.D./Masters of Studies in Environmental Law from Vermont Law School. She is licensed to practice law in Pennsylvania and Mississippi. As Director, Stephanie oversees a variety of legal education, research, and outreach activities, including providing legal research services to Sea Grant constituents on ocean and coastal law issues. Stephanie also teaches a foundational course on ocean and coastal law at the University of Mississippi School of Law. Stephanie has conducted extensive research on marine aquaculture.