Monday, April 18, 2016

The usefulness, value and utility of BugwoodImages is demonstrated in the April 2016 Issue of “IPM Insights”, the Newsletter of the Northeastern (USA) IPM Center

Access the April 2016 Issue (Volume 13: issue 2) at:

An image of Colorado potato beetle taken by David Cappaert [Michigan State University] is used to illustrate the article “End of an Era of Easy Pest Solutions” about the issues of managing Colorado potato beetle.

An image depicting Palmer amaranth in a field taken by Howard Schwartz [Colorado State University] is used to illustrate the article “Eco Solutions Answer to Herbicide Resistance” about IPM solutions to managing herbicide resistance.

The article “Photographers Lift Pests’ Poise” is about images available for educational use that resulting from a Cornell University / Bugwood partnership that was established through a Northeastern IPM Center grant.  Additionally, an image depicting hesitant dagger moth larva by Bruce Watt [University of Maine] is used to illustrate this article.

An image showing fire blight symptoms by Rebecca Wallace [University of Georgia] is used in the article titled “Antibiotic-Resistant Fire Blight". 

Friday, April 8, 2016

Rampaging Radioactive Wild Boars Causing Havoc

by Lynne Hayes.  Original article in: Growing America. Friday April 8th, 2016

 Lynne Hayes’ article highlights a major invasive species problem being manifested in the Fukushima region of Japan, an area in Japan that includes the 12 mile radius of the “exclusion zone” that experienced the nuclear disaster resulting from the Fukushima Hamadōri earthquake and subsequent tsunami on 11 March 2011.  

As if a nuclear disaster wasn't overwhelming enough in the Fukushima region of Japan, now the farmers who live in the area are being overrun by wild boars—thousands of them—with razor sharp tusks. And to top it off, they’re radioactive.

They’re full of radiation, so not only can’t they be eaten, they must be buried in concrete pits much like any disposed of radioactive material.  That has created an even bigger problem in Japan—mass graves that were built to hold 600 boars each are already full and there is a shortage of people qualified to cremate them.

Their problem????  Not so fast: see the section: Pigging Out In America … feral hogs are OUR problem as well.  Though not radioactive, according to the USDA, the United States is home to more than 5 million feral hogs. These ‘cousins” of the wild boar are capable of devastating damage to crops and can seriously upset the balance of our ecosystem.

Friday, April 1, 2016

Map Callery Pear Challenge!

How many states are seeing Callery Pear becoming an invasive issue? Map infestations you see and let's find out! 
The University of Illinois is mapping Callery Pear in their state - Let's all join the challenge
The University of Illinois Extension Forestry is encouraging everyone in the state to map Callery Pear.  This invasive is rapidly spreading across the state.  Currently we have documented escaped populations in 65/102 counties in Illinois but we are sure it is more widespread than that.  And, based upon the data in, we are ahead of the other states in mapping this species!  As we are asking everyone in Illinois to help fill out our map, I want to challenge the other Midwestern states to do the same!  Let’s build a single map that relays the true distribution of this species across the Midwest!
 We’re asking everyone to report to or use the GLEDN app -
Christopher EvansForestry Extension and Research SpecialistUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignDepartment of Natural Resources & Environmental Sciences
To find the best app in your area for mapping Callery Pear and other invasive species go to: EDDMapS Apps